College News

This is our life’s work—and we’re working to share our life’s next chapter with you. Temple College of Liberal Arts students, alumni and faculty are forging new paths every day in dozens of exciting disciplines, and we want you to know about them! Read about their discoveries, accomplishments and events here and please contact us if you have a story you think we should tell. From Africology to Criminal Justice, from Psychology to Spanish, the College teaches its students how to see the world from new perspectives and make a meaningful impact in their chosen field. Follow their adventures here and see where their journeys lead them next.

photo of Kaya Jones

Like everyone in her cohort, Kaya Jones, CLA ‘20, graduated into a world of uncertainty. The Political Science Department wanted to help and connected Jones with a mentor who helped her land an exciting new job—his. His former job, that is.

Political Science

photo of Elfreth's Alley overlayed with art from the podcast "The Alley Cast"

Ted Maust, CLA 2018, is putting his Temple University Master of Arts in Public History (MAPH) degree to good use as director of Philadelphia’s Elfreth’s Alley Museum. And thanks to the contributions of some current MAPH students, he’s making the alley more accessible than ever with a podcast that engages stories of race, gender, sexuality, social class and other topics—stories often left untold at popular historical sites.

History

photo of Sara Wright

Temple University’s new Master of Public Policy and Master of Public Health dual degree program trains graduate students to successfully navigate an interdisciplinary career in public policy and public health. Here, the program’s first-ever student shares her insights on what the program has to offer you.

Public Policy

A group of College of Liberal Arts English majors is learning what it’s like to be educators by virtually tutoring Philadelphia-area kids through a program called Mighty Writers.

English

Miles Orvell, an English and American Studies professor, uses his latest book to examine how we experience American ruins through photography and other media and what their “creative destruction” means for our future.

American Studies, English

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