Geography and Urban Studies News

In more ways than one, nature, society and urbanism intersect, and here at Temple University’s College of Liberal Arts, we explore the causes and results of that intersection. The Department of Geography and Urban Studies researches this topic and provides undergraduate and graduate students with the skills and knowledge necessary to explore how space, place and scale effect the connection between nature and society. The department has a specialized focus on urban studies, here you’ll find content relative to everything our students, faculty and alumni are doing to further geographic analysis of all kinds. Follow the stories here to understand the impact of those changes and please contact us if you have a story of your own you think we should tell.

 

photo of students presenting at capstone

The Professional Science Master in Geographic Information Systems challenges students to find real-world applications for the advanced technical training they receive in the program. This year’s graduates focused their capstones on their work with Philadelphia City Council, the Share Food Program and several other exciting organizations.

photos of 8 graduating seniors in the article below

The College of Liberal Arts is excited to have so many amazing seniors joining our alumni network by graduating this month! The circumstances of your final semester with us were unusual, to say the least, but you didn’t let them hold you back. You made it! Now, let’s celebrate together!

Julia Wolanski, CST ’16 and CLA ’17, joined the Philadelphia Department of Public Health in March as a geospatial research associate and is spending her days researching the spread of COVID-19 throughout the city.

photo of Jillian Eller posing by scenic landscape

Jillian Eller, CLA ’18, will be visiting campus January 30 as part of the National Service Meet and Greet event to discuss the benefits of students enrolling in a year of service following graduation. Here’s why Eller is enjoying her year of service and recommends it to other students.

A recent publication provides new evidence of drivers influencing the spatial distribution of invasive disease species. Traditionally, scientists have used environmental data such as temperature, precipitation or vegetation to predict the area occupied by a given species.

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