Africology and African American Studies News

Having more African American students than any other Northeastern University means Temple University’s College of Liberal Arts has more opportunities for more interesting stories. The College is proud to call Philadelphia, a majority-minority city, home. Here, we’ve highlighted some of the most exciting happenings from the students, alumni and faculty members who make the Department of Africology and African American Studies the uniquely thought-provoking and problem-solving department that it is. Read their stories below and please contact us if you have a story of your own you think we should tell.


Temple University’s African American Studies Department, the world’s first doctoral program in this particular field of study, is celebrating its 25th anniversary.  To celebrate, the department is sponsoring an African American Studies speaker series February 12 - April 30. Professor Niambi Carter organized the series, titled “Conversations across Diasporas.” Speakers to explore how different scholars are studying and researching the lives of people of African descent across time and space.

By Cindy Stansbury

The African American Studies Department gathered recently for its annual Fall Indaba. Students and faculty discussed department news among other topics.

Faculty credited undergraduate and graduate student efforts as well as staff work with the department’s recent growth. “Once a month they have a table down in the lobby and they are recruiting – helping us to recruit undergraduate students,” said department chair Dr. Molefi Kete Asante. “They did that on their own initiative. I think we should be very, very proud of what they have done.”

Mandela’s greatness resided in his character; this was the core of his charisma. He was a great man because he found the ability to make pragmatic politics while maintaining his revolutionary principles against racism and oppression. He was great because although we know how much he hated racism he seemed to live a life without any outward show of rancor and revenge.

Photo of Aaron Smith

Aaron Smith wowed his Representing Race class with a Temple-inspired version of Big Sean's "One Man Can Change the World."

Niyi Coker

Niyi Coker Jr., the first alumnus of Temple's African American studies PhD program, earned two awards for his documentary, Ota Benga.